Jackie and Maria by Gill Paul

http://gillpaul.com/ Available NOW!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aduTHQkmYC8 A great interview; the author discusses her novels The Lost Daughter and Jackie and Maria
https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/176890

The Grateful Reader Review by Dorothy Schwab

This novel of Jackie Kennedy, the most famous First Lady in American history paired with the world-famous opera singer, Maria Callas, will snap readers right up and create chaos with emotions. Gill Paul parallels the public spectacle and heartbreak of Jackie’s marriage woes and her grieving process in front of the entire nation with the rise and fall of Maria Callas’ opera career and marriage to her manager. Enter- Aristotle Onassis! As Americans watched this whole “affair” play out publicly, in every form of the press, there are certain assumptions that were made. Readers will now question the actions of the First Lady and Maria Callas as they each endured tragedy and found ways to survive the media’s interruption and interpretation of their personal lives. This phenomenon is nothing new with the current media situation in 2020. Readers may feel a deep connection to Jackie, as many lived the days of Jack Kennedy’s presidency, assassination and the aftermath. Gill Paul creates the idyllic world readers have always imagined – the “Camelot” that Jackie herself coined-and then crushes those images with vivid descriptions and accounts. From the White House to La Traviata in Dallas, to Milan and private islands, readers will be whisked away in limousines and yachts to a world most will only read about. So pour a glass of champagne, don your big, black sunglasses, find a chaise on the deck of the Christina then hide behind Jackie and Maria for a private tour of the world of Jackie, Maria, and Aristotle Onassis.

One thought on “Jackie and Maria by Gill Paul

  1. I grabbed the ARC of this as soon as I saw it and was really expecting to love it. However, I got pissed off at how weak and helpless she portrayed Jackie, and how gullible and misunderstood she portrayed Maria. I doubt they were really that monochrome – they were both very complex women. Then there were the really inaccurate things she put in here, that angered me, and I’m afraid I DNF this book. Sorry!

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